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BUYING THE FARM

With new school complex, officials want to add working farm

Mecklenburg trustees back supes’ call for outside firm to scout sites

After long discussion, School Board offers grudging support

Arson suspected in Tuesday morning fire in Clarksville


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Comets’ season ends in regionals

The Comet boys’ varsity basketball team nearly rallied from a miserable start Monday night, before running out of late game momentum in a season-ending loss at Marshall in regional action.

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News

Bring out yer dead – again

SoVaNow.com / April 08, 2013
Halifax’s Earth Day this year will afford another opportunity to recycle cast-off electronics that don’t belong in landfills.

St. John’s Episcopal Church in Halifax will sponsor a free collection on that Saturday, April 20. The truck will be behind Legal Aid on Houston Street beside the library 10 a.m.-4 p.m.

Items that may be dropped off include:

all kinds of computers

monitors

hard drives

modems

plug-and-play devices

printers, scanners, copiers and fax machines

DVD and VCR players

commercial telephones

microwaves

video game systems

air conditioners

wire and cable

The church is doing it for environmental stewardship, not as a fund-raiser; no money changes hands.

“We’re continuing to be good stewards of the earth, for the next generation,” said Peg Anderson, the church’s chairman for the initiative. She hopes to see it as an annual event.

For Earth Day 2011, Scott Recycling of Knoxville, Tenn., brought two huge trucks to cart off the electronics: 8,091 pounds worth.

In some cases, according to Scott, a computer hard drive is wiped and the device is refurbished; in others, the material is reclaimed. Scott says it prides itself on being a “zero-landfill” facility.

According to EPA estimates from 2007, only 15-20 percent of electronics are recycled in this country — all while the sheer number of electronics is anticipated to grow exponentially worldwide in the coming decade.

While all these discarded consumer goods are bringing their dangerous materials into landfills, they also contain valuable and scarce materials that recyclers want: glass, copper, gold, palladium, silver and tin, for example.

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