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Native son takes on task of leading Clarksville

South Boston News
Jeff Jones
SoVaNow.com / March 13, 2013
Clarksville Town Council has turned to a native son, Jeff Jones, to fill the position of town manager, most recently held on an interim basis by Dr. Charles Lee, and before that by Melinda Moran.

He is a graduate of Bluestone High School and Averett University, a former employee of Burlington Industries, and past President of both the Clarksville Ruritan Club and Clarksville Dixie Youth Baseball. He and wife Carol have two children.

Jones officially begins the job on April 2. He is currently the business manager and transportation supervisor for Mecklenburg County Public Schools. During his 8-1/2 years with the school system Jones also served as the procurement officer, and for a time, as supervisor of food services and the maintenance staff.

“I know Dr. Charles Lee is an extremely tough act to follow,” Jones said of his immediate predecessor. “I enjoyed the brief experience I had working with him on annexation [on behalf of the school system]. I admire and agree with the way he empowered people in their positions and hope to follow his lead.”

Jones unknowingly spent the past 25 years of his life preparing for a job he never thought about until recently. He has both government and private sector experience. His breadth of experience includes procurement, budgeting, management and customer relations.

While at Burlington, where he was employed for over 13 years, Jones designed and helped implement enterprise resource planning (ERP) software applications. ERP is integrated software that allows for the sharing of information and data throughout a business or organization — from finance and accounting to customer relationship management. Simply put, the software packages he designed allowed the various departments in each business or going concern to better work together toward a common goal — they facilitated communication.

After Burlington closed, he continued to develop ERP applications, but this time through a startup software company located in Greensboro. When the dot-com bubble burst, Jones took a job with Mecklenburg County Public Schools.

“I am grateful for the job and the experience it gave me,” Jones says of his time working for the school system. He was particularly appreciative of his time with Dr. John Keeler, who served as Jones’ immediate boss and Assistant Superintendent for Administration and Finances in Mecklenburg County Public Schools for the past three year.

Council member Caroline Hite, said of Jones, He brings to Clarksville the best and most positive image. He will be a great ambassador for our town.” She, along with Connie Torres, spearheaded efforts to find a replacement for Moran.

It was Jones’ diversity of experience and knowledge that most impressed Hite. “He has experience in both the public and private sector, and his IT knowledge can make the town run more efficiently and help us [the town and Council] to spend the taxpayers’ dollars more wisely.”

Jones inherits a job in a town that is still working to reinvent itself after losing two major employers in the 1990s — Burlington Industries where Jones was employed and Russell Stover Candy Company. He also inherits a town that is about to grow by over 700 acres, adding both commercial and residential properties. Yet he appears undaunted.

“I’ve seen a lot of changes in this town in my lifetime [having lived in the area since he was 3 months old]. Clarksville is a diamond in the rough. I feel we are only at the cusp of what we can be.”

The enthusiasm Jones expresses for his new job is shared by many in the community who grew up with him, or worked with him, in business or in civic organizations. The phrase most uttered by those who know him is “He has an incredible work ethic.”

As he transitions into the job, Jones said he has one over-arching goal for Clarksville — economic development. While he believes his experience in business development and planning will be useful when devising a strategic economic development plan for the town, he does not have any preconceived notions of what residents want or need — aside from the public’s often-stated desire for tourism and a more business friendly atmosphere.

He is also well aware of the economic limitations that all of Southside Virginia faces. Nevertheless, Clarksville has, in Jones opinion, two things the other areas do not, a lake, and a talented pool of retirees. “They also have a state of the art water and sewer system.”

Even with those assets, Jones said “You can’t get in there [begin a new job] and tell everyone what they need to move ahead.” Therefore, one of his first acts will involve building relationships with employees, area economic development groups, and business and civic organizations. At the same time, he plans to build relationships with area residents, hoping to tap into what he calls “a great resource,” retirees to the area. “They bring an amazing set of skills, which when used only make the town a better place.”

As proof of this point, he cites his experience working with the late John Moody Price, a retired civilian contractor with the Navy. “During my ten years with the Ruritan Club, [John Price] had an idea, to build a community center for Clarksville. He brought together a diverse group of people, and shared his skills to build the Community Center we have today.”

Jones also believes that change can be done incrementally. He is willing to start small asking such questions as should the town try to bring more events to the downtown area during the summer, and if so what events? Can Robbins Park host other events to generate income, such as concerts or a movie night? What do we need to do to bring both residents and others into Clarksville to shop, dine, or visit?

Finally, Jones said despite Clarksville’s growing reputation as a retirement area, the needs of the youth cannot be neglected. He stopped short of laying out plans for the children, preferring to wait until he has spoken with parents, school officials, and others.

As Jones transitions into his new job, he said, “I know it’s a tall task, but we need to get the right combination of new and old to be successful, and I look forward to helping Clarksville achieve success.”



Clarksville Town Council has turned to a native son, Jeff Jones, to fill the position of Town Manager, most recently held on an interim basis by Dr. Charles Lee, and before that by Melinda Moran.

He is a graduate of Bluestone High School and Averett University, a former employee of Burlington Industries, and past President of both the Clarksville Ruritan Club and Clarksville Dixie Youth Baseball. He and wife Carol have two children.

Jones officially begins the job on April 2. He is currently the business manager and transportation supervisor for Mecklenburg County Public Schools. During his 8-1/2 years with the school system Jones also served as the procurement officer, and for a time, as supervisor of food services and the maintenance staff.

“I know Dr. Charles Lee is an extremely tough act to follow,” Jones said of his immediate predecessor. “I enjoyed the brief experience I had working with him on annexation [on behalf of the school system]. I admire and agree with the way he empowered people in their positions and hope to follow his lead.”

Jones unknowingly spent the past 25 years of his life preparing for a job he never thought about until recently. He has both government and private sector experience. His breadth of experience includes procurement, budgeting, management and customer relations.

While at Burlington, where he was employed for over 13 years, Jones designed and helped implement enterprise resource planning (ERP) software applications. ERP is integrated software that allows for the sharing of information and data throughout a business or organization — from finance and accounting to customer relationship management. Simply put, the software packages he designed allowed the various departments in each business or going concern to better work together toward a common goal — they facilitated communication.

After Burlington closed, he continued to develop ERP applications, but this time through a startup software company located in Greensboro. When the dot-com bubble burst, Jones took a job with Mecklenburg County Public Schools.

“I am grateful for the job and the experience it gave me,” Jones says of his time working for the school system. He was particularly appreciative of his time with Dr. John Keeler, who served as Jones’ immediate boss and Assistant Superintendent for Administration and Finances in Mecklenburg County Public Schools for the past three year.

Council member Caroline Hite, said of Jones, He brings to Clarksville the best and most positive image. He will be a great ambassador for our town.” She, along with Connie Torres, spearheaded efforts to find a replacement for Moran.

It was Jones’ diversity of experience and knowledge that most impressed Hite. “He has experience in both the public and private sector, and his IT knowledge can make the town run more efficiently and help us [the town and Council] to spend the taxpayers’ dollars more wisely.”

Jones inherits a job in a town that is still working to reinvent itself after losing two major employers in the 1990s — Burlington Industries where Jones was employed and Russell Stover Candy Company. He also inherits a town that is about to grow by over 700 acres, adding both commercial and residential properties. Yet he appears undaunted.

“I’ve seen a lot of changes in this town in my lifetime [having lived in the area since he was 3 months old]. Clarksville is a diamond in the rough. I feel we are only at the cusp of what we can be.”

The enthusiasm Jones expresses for his new job is shared by many in the community who grew up with him, or worked with him, in business or in civic organizations. The phrase most uttered by those who know him is “He has an incredible work ethic.”

As he transitions into the job, Jones said he has one over-arching goal for Clarksville — economic development. While he believes his experience in business development and planning will be useful when devising a strategic economic development plan for the town, he does not have any preconceived notions of what residents want or need — aside from the public’s often-stated desire for tourism and a more business friendly atmosphere.

He is also well aware of the economic limitations that all of Southside Virginia faces. Nevertheless, Clarksville has, in Jones opinion, two things the other areas do not, a lake, and a talented pool of retirees. “They also have a state of the art water and sewer system.”

Even with those assets, Jones said “You can’t get in there [begin a new job] and tell everyone what they need to move ahead.” Therefore, one of his first acts will involve building relationships with employees, area economic development groups, and business and civic organizations. At the same time, he plans to build relationships with area residents, hoping to tap into what he calls “a great resource,” retirees to the area. “They bring an amazing set of skills, which when used only make the town a better place.”

As proof of this point, he cites his experience working with the late John Moody Price, a retired civilian contractor with the Navy. “During my ten years with the Ruritan Club, [John Price] had an idea, to build a community center for Clarksville. He brought together a diverse group of people, and shared his skills to build the Community Center we have today.”

Jones also believes that change can be done incrementally. He is willing to start small asking such questions as should the town try to bring more events to the downtown area during the summer, and if so what events? Can Robbins Park host other events to generate income, such as concerts or a movie night? What do we need to do to bring both residents and others into Clarksville to shop, dine, or visit?

Finally, Jones said despite Clarksville’s growing reputation as a retirement area, the needs of the youth cannot be neglected. He stopped short of laying out plans for the children, preferring to wait until he has spoken with parents, school officials, and others.

As Jones transitions into his new job, he said, “I know it’s a tall task, but we need to get the right combination of new and old to be successful, and I look forward to helping Clarksville achieve success.”

Clarksville Town Council has turned to a native son, Jeff Jones, to fill the position of Town Manager, most recently held on an interim basis by Dr. Charles Lee, and before that by Melinda Moran.

He is a graduate of Bluestone High School and Averett University, a former employee of Burlington Industries, and past President of both the Clarksville Ruritan Club and Clarksville Dixie Youth Baseball. He and wife Carol have two children.

Jones officially begins the job on April 2. He is currently the business manager and transportation supervisor for Mecklenburg County Public Schools. During his 8-1/2 years with the school system Jones also served as the procurement officer, and for a time, as supervisor of food services and the maintenance staff.

“I know Dr. Charles Lee is an extremely tough act to follow,” Jones said of his immediate predecessor. “I enjoyed the brief experience I had working with him on annexation [on behalf of the school system]. I admire and agree with the way he empowered people in their positions and hope to follow his lead.”

Jones unknowingly spent the past 25 years of his life preparing for a job he never thought about until recently. He has both government and private sector experience. His breadth of experience includes procurement, budgeting, management and customer relations.

While at Burlington, where he was employed for over 13 years, Jones designed and helped implement enterprise resource planning (ERP) software applications. ERP is integrated software that allows for the sharing of information and data throughout a business or organization — from finance and accounting to customer relationship management. Simply put, the software packages he designed allowed the various departments in each business or going concern to better work together toward a common goal — they facilitated communication.

After Burlington closed, he continued to develop ERP applications, but this time through a startup software company located in Greensboro. When the dot-com bubble burst, Jones took a job with Mecklenburg County Public Schools.

“I am grateful for the job and the experience it gave me,” Jones says of his time working for the school system. He was particularly appreciative of his time with Dr. John Keeler, who served as Jones’ immediate boss and Assistant Superintendent for Administration and Finances in Mecklenburg County Public Schools for the past three year.

Council member Caroline Hite, said of Jones, He brings to Clarksville the best and most positive image. He will be a great ambassador for our town.” She, along with Connie Torres, spearheaded efforts to find a replacement for Moran.

It was Jones’ diversity of experience and knowledge that most impressed Hite. “He has experience in both the public and private sector, and his IT knowledge can make the town run more efficiently and help us [the town and Council] to spend the taxpayers’ dollars more wisely.”

Jones inherits a job in a town that is still working to reinvent itself after losing two major employers in the 1990s — Burlington Industries where Jones was employed and Russell Stover Candy Company. He also inherits a town that is about to grow by over 700 acres, adding both commercial and residential properties. Yet he appears undaunted.

“I’ve seen a lot of changes in this town in my lifetime [having lived in the area since he was 3 months old]. Clarksville is a diamond in the rough. I feel we are only at the cusp of what we can be.”

The enthusiasm Jones expresses for his new job is shared by many in the community who grew up with him, or worked with him, in business or in civic organizations. The phrase most uttered by those who know him is “He has an incredible work ethic.”

As he transitions into the job, Jones said he has one over-arching goal for Clarksville — economic development. While he believes his experience in business development and planning will be useful when devising a strategic economic development plan for the town, he does not have any preconceived notions of what residents want or need — aside from the public’s often-stated desire for tourism and a more business friendly atmosphere.

He is also well aware of the economic limitations that all of Southside Virginia faces. Nevertheless, Clarksville has, in Jones opinion, two things the other areas do not, a lake, and a talented pool of retirees. “They also have a state of the art water and sewer system.”

Even with those assets, Jones said “You can’t get in there [begin a new job] and tell everyone what they need to move ahead.” Therefore, one of his first acts will involve building relationships with employees, area economic development groups, and business and civic organizations. At the same time, he plans to build relationships with area residents, hoping to tap into what he calls “a great resource,” retirees to the area. “They bring an amazing set of skills, which when used only make the town a better place.”

As proof of this point, he cites his experience working with the late John Moody Price, a retired civilian contractor with the Navy. “During my ten years with the Ruritan Club, [John Price] had an idea, to build a community center for Clarksville. He brought together a diverse group of people, and shared his skills to build the Community Center we have today.”

Jones also believes that change can be done incrementally. He is willing to start small asking such questions as should the town try to bring more events to the downtown area during the summer, and if so what events? Can Robbins Park host other events to generate income, such as concerts or a movie night? What do we need to do to bring both residents and others into Clarksville to shop, dine, or visit?

Finally, Jones said despite Clarksville’s growing reputation as a retirement area, the needs of the youth cannot be neglected. He stopped short of laying out plans for the children, preferring to wait until he has spoken with parents, school officials, and others.

As Jones transitions into his new job, he said, “I know it’s a tall task, but we need to get the right combination of new and old to be successful, and I look forward to helping Clarksville achieve success.”

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You couldn't have hired a better imbecile for this job. What a jerk! I would have serious concerns about any company or individual who has hired Mr. Jones. I don't care if he came from the area or not. It's a good thing they released him from the school system, he wasn't doing anyone any good there. I am confident that he will equally screw up this new position in Clarksville. I am here to tell you that after first hand experiences, working with this person is a bonified nightmare. It may be a good thing Mr. Jones is from there, he can also rot there too. Good luck Clarksville!!! You're gonna need it with this idiot at the helm!


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